"Every time I paint a portrait I lose a friend. " - John Singer Sargent (1856 - 1925)

Bouquet of violet flowers

Matthew Moss' bouquet of violet flowers is a melange of various tints of violet and a good example of the freedom that the alla-prima technique of watercolour painting allows. The technique, more common in ancient Chinese and Japanese painting, is to fix clearly in ones mental eye the form of the scene before you, and draw or paint from the image rather than directly from the subject. On the other hand - Leonardo da Vinci and Jan van Eyck are good examples - the artist from the Renaissance until recent times observed the subject with a scholar’s eye. By the nineteenth century scientific observation and recording of nature, influenced in no small part by the scientific archaeology concepts of Johann Joachim Winkelmann had gained prominence permitting of great detail in drawings. The most complete example of this close and careful study of nature are the minutiae of plants, weapons and archaeological details found in the massively large1854 canvas that Matthew Moss restored in the National Gallery of Ireland, painted by the Irish Victorian painter Daniel Maclise entitled, ‘The Marriage of Aoife and Strongbow” .
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_de_Clare,_2nd_Earl_of_Pembroke

Flowers and Trees are available for book illustrations, annual reports, paper and packaging, giftware, related products. You can license them in the following format: Original transparencies in 6 x 6 cm. (2¼ in.) format, high-resolution RGB drum scans on DVD or efficient and quick E-Mail or FTP upload.