"A painting is never finished, only abandoned" - Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)

Sepia pen and ink drawing of dried wildflowers of the Italian Riviera

The artist's sepia painting, done with a hand-cut reed pen, shows what may be the same painting that you see in 'Italian Riviera wildflowers of Costa Rainera.'* By now the wildflowers have faded and lost their ephemeral beautiful and pastel-like tints and assume - it would seem - the skeleton forms of a painting by the Armenian USA expressionist Arshile Gorky. In place of the flowers' petals there are seed pods particularly noticeable on the centre and top left of the drawing. You can see in the background of the watercolour traces of the the roughly sketched in pencil outline that Matthew Moss created to define the work of art's structure. The artist's intention in laying out this skeleton was to create a composition that covered the watercolour paper support from the bottom left, and, in a diagonal direction, move up to the top right of the support. Despite the impromptu nature of artist Moss' watercolours of flowers it is evident of the importance he attached to creating a strong underlying structure and almost classic attention to the work of art's basic composition.
*http://www.artmontecarlo.com/image_details.php?painting_id=698

Flowers and Trees are available for book illustrations, annual reports, paper and packaging, giftware, related products. You can license them in the following format: Original transparencies in 6 x 6 cm. (2¼ in.) format, high-resolution RGB drum scans on DVD or efficient and quick E-Mail or FTP upload.